The hot ticket right now isn’t “Rocketman” or even “Godzilla: King of the Monsters.” No, it’s actress Olivia Wilde’s directing debut, “Booksmart,” about two best friends who spent their high school years with their noses to the grindstone to ensure they made it into Ivy League schools — only to discover that some of their classmates, who had more fun, got in some also. So on the eve of graduation, they try to pack four years of fun into one night, and spend it running around trying to find The Party.

Is it here? No. We’re not even seeing trailers. But what did open was “Dark Phoenix,” another in the interminable “X-Men” films, this one with Brit Sophie Turner coming off a star turn in HBO’s “Game of Thrones” as Sansa Stark. She makes her feature film debut in “Dark Phoenix,” which includes the usuals as well as some bigger names: James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jessica Chastain, Jennifer Lawrence, et al. What is the attraction here?

We hope we’re getting Emma Thompson’s film “Late Night,” with Mindy Kaling, whom many TV fans will remember as Kelly Kapoor in the hit NBC sitcom “The Office” (which was a British import). It opened Friday and we’re assured in Cinemark marketing that we’re getting it, and they’re showing the trailers, so hopefully...

Thompson’s agent and the film’s marketing team have had her booked to the nines to hawk the film. She even hosted the “Saturday Night Live” Mother’s Day show. And did a darn fine job of it. Thompson is one of those British actresses who is always relevant and imminently sellable.

She comes from British acting royalty, was educated at Cambridge and is not only an actress and author, but also a screenwriter and political activist. She has won two Oscars (“Howards End,” acting; “Sense and Sensibility,” adapted screenplay), Baftas, Golden Globes, etc.; and is remembered for period roles as well as contemporary — like her heart-breaking turn in “Love, Actually.” It is perfectly reasonable for her to take on the role of an aging late-night talk show host who’s afraid her show may be cancelled because it’s become irrelevant. And Kaling wrote the screenplay.

I wish I thought we might see Kenneth Branagh’s latest. “All is True,” in which he does finally play the Bard, William Shakespeare himself, aging and going home to Stratford-on-Avon late in life, after London has become too much for him. He goes home to a resentful wife (Judi Dench) and children who have no relationship with him. Advance is snide. But it’s Branagh.

We should get “Stuber” in July (i.e., trailers look like it’s something Cinemark would bring in). It looks to be a hilarious comedy with that darling stand-up comedian and actor Kumail Nanjiani, who did “The Big Sick” two years ago, playing an Uber driver who picks up a very large, very crazy cop and the guy he’s chasing. There’s fireworks and more riders, since the client hit “share.”

Is it here? No. We’re not even seeing trailers. But what did open was “Dark Phoenix,” another in the interminable “X-Men” films, this one with Brit Sophie Turner coming off a star turn in HBO’s “Game of Thrones” as Sansa Stark. She makes her feature film debut in “Dark Phoenix,” which includes the usuals as well as some bigger names: James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jessica Chastain, Jennifer Lawrence, et al. What is the attraction here?

We hope we’re getting Emma Thompson’s film “Late Night,” with Mindy Kaling, whom many TV fans will remember as Kelly Kapoor in the hit NBC sitcom, “The Office” (which was a British import). It opened the June 7 and we’re assured in Cinemark marketing that we’re getting it, and they’re showing the trailers, so hopefully...

Thompson’s agent and the film’s marketing team have had her booked to the nines to hawk the film. She even hosted the “Saturday Night Live” Mother’s Day show. And did a darn fine job of it. Thompson is one of those British actresses who is always relevant and imminently sellable.

She comes from British acting royalty, was educated at Cambridge and is not only an actress and author, but also a screenwriter and political activist. She has won two Oscars (“Howards End,” acting; “Sense and Sensibility,” adapted screenplay), Baftas, Golden Globes, etc.; and is remembered for period roles as well as contemporary — like her heart-breaking turn in “Love, Actually.” It is perfectly reasonable for her to take on the role of an aging late-night talk show host who’s afraid her show may be cancelled because it’s become irrelevant. And Kaling wrote the screenplay.

I wish I thought we might see Kenneth Branagh’s latest. “All is True,” in which he does finally play the Bard, William Shakespeare himself, aging and going home to Stratford-on-Avon late in life, after London has become too much for him. He goes home to a resentful wife (Judi Dench) and children who have no relationship with him. Advance is snide. But it’s Branagh.

We should get “Stuber” in July (i.e. trailers look like it’s something Cinemark would bring in). It looks to be a hilarious comedy with that darling stand-up comedian and actor Kumail Nanjiani, who did “The Big Sick” two years ago, playing an Uber driver who picks up a very large, very crazy cop and the guy he’s chasing. There’s fireworks and more riders, since the client hit ‘share.’

See you at the movies.

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